Determining what does or doesn’t your Medicaid plan cover is often challenging. It is particularly true if you need to find out about medical devices. Because of the varied coverage in different states, there needs to be more precise documentation on covered medical services and support, including coverage for incontinence supplies.

Additionally, frequent changes to coverage and benefits are confusing for Medicaid recipients. They need help understanding the covered medical supplies and ways to maximize their benefits. Medicaid typically pays for medically essential procedures, supplies, or services for low-income, elderly, disabled, or blind people.

One common question that many people with urinary incontinence have in mind is, “Are incontinence supplies covered by Medicaid?”

What Is Incontinence And What Causes It?

Urinary incontinence refers to the loss of bladder control. It is one of the standards and embarrassing issues many people have to deal with post-surgery. 

UI severity varies from rarely leaking urine during sneezing or coughing to a sudden, urgent urge to urinate that prevents you from reaching a bathroom in time.

Urinary incontinence is not a natural part of becoming older, even though it happens more frequently as people age. Do not hesitate to visit your doctor if urine incontinence interferes with your everyday activities. Most people can address urinary incontinence symptoms with easy food, lifestyle adjustments, or medical attention.

Your everyday habits or underlying medical issues can cause you UI. According to Mayo Clinic, certain foods, drinks, and medications stimulate the bladder and increase UI symptoms.

What Are The Different Types Of Incontinence?

UI can be of many types. Some common types include;

Urge Incontinence

Urge incontinence is the inability to hold back a sudden, intense urge to urinate. The bladder spasms or contracts and causes pee loss.

Stress Incontinence

When you cough, laugh, sneeze, run, or do the heavy lifting, the stress (strain) on your bladder causes you to leak urine. This condition is known as stress incontinence.

Overflow Incontinence

You have overflow incontinence when you feel the urge to urinate but can only manage a tiny amount. A weak bladder muscle or a blockage may cause it.

Functional Incontinence

Functional incontinence happens when a person’s bowel and bladder are functioning regularly yet can’t use the bathroom. It can be a result of any mental or physical illness.

Post-Micturition Dribble (PMD)

PMD, or post-micturition dribbling, is the involuntary leakage of urine immediately after urination.

Mixed Incontinence

In women with severe stress incontinence, movements like laughing, sneezing, exercising, and standing up can leak urine.

What Types Of Incontinence Supplies Do I Need?

You can handle mild, moderate, and severe urinary incontinence symptoms with various tools. However, you should choose the ones that suit your condition and meets your UI needs. Here are some UI supplies you can select from: 

Adult Diapers and Disposable Briefs

Diapers are for urine and bowel (fecal). They require patients to remove their clothing. Changing briefs doesn’t require taking down pants. It’s easiest to change while lying down to get the right fit.

Children’s Pull-Up Diapers And Training Pants

Although training pants include a waistline with an elastic band, they are less absorbent than pull-ups. Many people, therefore, find it less comfortable. Pull-ups, however, are comparable to diapers in absorbency; however, they can’t withstand particularly large urination during nighttime. 

Booster Pads

Supplemental goods known as booster pads are designed to augment the absorption of adult incontinence shorts or pairs of underwear. The absorbent pads give an absorbent garment a “boost” to make it more valuable and effective.

Disposable Bladder Pads

Also referred to as “underpads,” disposable bladder pads offer excellent safety to people with UI. You can spread them on the top of the mattress.

Disposable Under Pads (Bed pads Or Chux)

Super absorbent disposable underpads can safeguard mattresses against urination damage. You can place the pad above or below the sheets to absorb liquid.

Does Medicaid Cover Incontinence Supplies? 

Yes, Medicaid covers incontinence supplies. 

For certain Medicaid receivers, State Medicaid programs often pay for medically necessary incontinence goods, including boosters, adult diapers (also called disposable briefs), pull-on underwear, and underpads, including youth items. You should know a few crucial insurance company guidelines and requirements. 

Only the elderly, disabled, or children with extensive medical needs are eligible for coverage of incontinence products. Benefits for incontinence products under Medicaid typically begin for children with complicated healthcare requirements at ages 3 to 4 because they learn how to use the restroom independently.

Also, you need to obtain the following to become eligible for incontinence supplies. 

  • Doctor’s prescription with UI diagnosis
  • Certificate/Letter of Medical Necessity (LMN)
  • Prior Authorization (PA)

Medicaid offers coverage for UI supplies. However, you should understand the eligibility criteria and requirements before applying. Regardless of your chosen supplies, buy or source them from reputed suppliers such as Active Life Medical Products. They have a range of quality UI products to help you manage UI.

Active Life Medical Products Can Help With Incontinence

and Catheter  Supplies


You need a trusted medical supplier when you require incontinence and catheter supplies. Active Life Medical Products makes ordering the entire catheter supply process easy. Our Product Specialists can help you get your prescribed catheter covered through most insurances. Everything will be delivered directly to your front door.

Call Active Life Medical Products at (800) 319-2336 to place your order.

Find out more about catheter covered by Medicaid here.