Glossary Entry: Dilator Catheter

Overview

Definition: A medical device used to dilate or widen a narrow or obstructed passageway in the body, typically in the urethra or other tubular structures.

Detailed Description

Types and Variations

Variations: There are different sizes and types of dilator catheters available, including straight or curved designs, with or without balloons, and varying diameters to suit different patient needs.

Indications

Common Uses: Dilator catheters are commonly used in medical procedures such as urethral dilation, strictures, or to facilitate the passage of other medical instruments.

Insertion and Placement

Procedure: Dilator catheters are inserted into the target passageway using a lubricant to ease insertion. Careful attention must be paid to proper placement to avoid injury or discomfort to the patient.

Clinical Considerations

Potential Complications

Risks: Potential complications of using a dilator catheter include infection, bleeding, perforation of the urethra, or discomfort during insertion.

Care and Maintenance

Maintenance Requirements: Dilator catheters should be cleaned and sterilized before and after each use to prevent infection and ensure patient safety.

Additional Information

Related Devices

Associated Terms: Other related devices include Foley catheters, suprapubic catheters, and nephrostomy tubes, which may be used in conjunction with dilator catheters for different medical purposes.

Innovations and Advancements

Recent Developments: Recent advancements in dilator catheter technology include the use of antimicrobial coatings to reduce the risk of infection and the development of disposable, single-use catheters for improved hygiene.

Regulatory and Safety Notes

Regulations: Dilator catheters are regulated medical devices that must meet specific safety and quality standards set by regulatory bodies such as the FDA to ensure patient safety.

FAQ 1: What is a dilator catheter?

A dilator catheter is a medical device used to dilate or widen a narrow or obstructed passageway in the body, typically in the urethra or other tubular structures.

FAQ 2: What are the different types of dilator catheters available?

There are various sizes and types of dilator catheters, including straight or curved designs, with or without balloons, and varying diameters to suit different patient needs.

FAQ 3: What are the common uses of dilator catheters in medical procedures?

Dilator catheters are commonly used in procedures such as urethral dilation, strictures, or to facilitate the passage of other medical instruments.

FAQ 4: How are dilator catheters inserted and placed in the body?

Dilator catheters are inserted into the target passageway using a lubricant to ease insertion. Proper placement is crucial to avoid injury or discomfort to the patient.

FAQ 5: What are the potential complications of using a dilator catheter?

Potential complications include infection, bleeding, perforation of the urethra, or discomfort during insertion.

FAQ 6: What are the maintenance requirements for dilator catheters?

Dilator catheters should be cleaned and sterilized before and after each use to prevent infection and ensure patient safety.

FAQ 7: What are some related devices to dilator catheters?

Other related devices include Foley catheters, suprapubic catheters, and nephrostomy tubes, which may be used in conjunction with dilator catheters for various medical purposes.

FAQ 8: What recent advancements have been made in dilator catheter technology?

Recent developments include the use of antimicrobial coatings to reduce infection risk and the creation of disposable, single-use catheters for improved hygiene.

FAQ 9: How are dilator catheters regulated for safety and quality?

Dilator catheters are regulated medical devices that must meet specific safety and quality standards set by regulatory bodies such as the FDA to ensure patient safety.

FAQ 10: Why are dilator catheters essential in medical procedures?

Dilator catheters play a crucial role in widening narrow or obstructed passageways in the body, aiding in medical procedures and improving patient outcomes.