Glossary Entry: Transluminal Catheter

Overview

Definition: A catheter designed to be inserted into a blood vessel or other hollow structure, allowing for the passage of fluids or instruments through the lumen. It is commonly used in medical procedures such as angioplasty, stent placement, and thrombectomy to access and treat specific areas within the body.

Detailed Description

Types and Variations

Variations: Transluminal catheters come in various sizes and designs, including balloon catheters for angioplasty, guiding catheters for stent placement, and aspiration catheters for thrombectomy procedures.

Indications

Common Uses: Transluminal catheters are commonly used in interventional cardiology, radiology, and vascular surgery to diagnose and treat conditions such as coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and cerebral aneurysms.

Insertion and Placement

Procedure: The transluminal catheter is typically inserted percutaneously using the Seldinger technique, where a needle is used to access the blood vessel followed by the insertion of a guidewire and catheter over the wire to the target site.

Clinical Considerations

Potential Complications

Risks: Potential complications of transluminal catheter insertion include vessel perforation, dissection, thrombosis, infection, and allergic reactions to contrast media.

Care and Maintenance

Maintenance Requirements: Proper care and maintenance of transluminal catheters include flushing with saline or heparin solution after use, checking for kinks or damage before insertion, and ensuring sterile handling to prevent infections.

Additional Information

Related Devices

Associated Terms: Related devices often used with transluminal catheters include angioplasty balloons, stents, guidewires, and contrast media injectors.

Innovations and Advancements

Recent Developments: Recent advancements in transluminal catheter technology include the development of drug-coated balloons and bioresorbable stents to improve treatment outcomes and reduce the risk of restenosis.

Regulatory and Safety Notes

Regulations: Transluminal catheters are regulated medical devices that must meet safety and performance standards set by regulatory authorities such as the FDA to ensure patient safety and device effectiveness.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Transluminal Catheter

Q1: What is a transluminal catheter?

A: A transluminal catheter is a medical device designed to be inserted into a blood vessel or other hollow structure to facilitate the passage of fluids or instruments through the lumen.

Q2: What are the common uses of transluminal catheters?

A: Transluminal catheters are commonly used in interventional cardiology, radiology, and vascular surgery to diagnose and treat conditions such as coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and cerebral aneurysms.

Q3: How are transluminal catheters inserted?

A: Transluminal catheters are typically inserted percutaneously using the Seldinger technique, where a needle is used to access the blood vessel followed by the insertion of a guidewire and catheter over the wire to the target site.

Q4: What are the potential complications of transluminal catheter insertion?

A: Potential complications of transluminal catheter insertion include vessel perforation, dissection, thrombosis, infection, and allergic reactions to contrast media.

Q5: How should transluminal catheters be cared for and maintained?

A: Proper care and maintenance of transluminal catheters include flushing with saline or heparin solution after use, checking for kinks or damage before insertion, and ensuring sterile handling to prevent infections.

Q6: What are some variations of transluminal catheters?

A: Transluminal catheters come in various sizes and designs, including balloon catheters for angioplasty, guiding catheters for stent placement, and aspiration catheters for thrombectomy procedures.

Q7: What are some related devices often used with transluminal catheters?

A: Related devices often used with transluminal catheters include angioplasty balloons, stents, guidewires, and contrast media injectors.

Q8: What recent advancements have been made in transluminal catheter technology?

A: Recent advancements in transluminal catheter technology include the development of drug-coated balloons and bioresorbable stents to improve treatment outcomes and reduce the risk of restenosis.

Q9: How are transluminal catheters regulated for safety and performance?

A: Transluminal catheters are regulated medical devices that must meet safety and performance standards set by regulatory authorities such as the FDA to ensure patient safety and device effectiveness.

Q10: What are the risks associated with transluminal catheter insertion?

A: Risks associated with transluminal catheter insertion include vessel perforation, dissection, thrombosis, infection, and allergic reactions to contrast media.